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  #361  
Old 06-25-2018, 10:35 PM
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Not a fan of aluminum tube fuel lines. The marginal weight reduction doesn't make up for the compromised safety, IMHO.

Which brings to mind this recent scary event. A friend, who has just finished his experimental airplane build, suddenly lost power at about 3k ft altitude. After going through proper protocol, he looked down and saw an old airfield with big yellow X's on the runway below him. He immediately dead sticked the plane down, successfully landing with no damage. He left a trail of fuel the length of his landing. Turns out he had a broken aluminum AN coupler in the fuel line. Looking at it, it appeared to this EE to be a fatigued aluminum tube within a swivel female to female coupling.

I told him not to bother buying a lottery ticket in the future, because his luck is all used up.

Depending on the useage of aluminum it can be just as safe as steel. In a non-moving, low vibration application, aluminum has no reason to fatigue (ie: frame rail runs) Flex lines are used in appropriate locations. The AN fittings are not lifetime items. In an aircraft there should be a lifespan limit dictated by runtime hours or number of times the fitting has been on/off. I think I can speak for all of us in this thread that giving a modified car a regular look-over is an important step in maintaining vehicle safety and reliability... Your friend is lucky for sure... Good piloting skills as well
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  #362  
Old 06-26-2018, 02:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bullshark View Post
Not a fan of aluminum tube fuel lines. The marginal weight reduction doesn't make up for the compromised safety, IMHO.

Which brings to mind this recent scary event. A friend, who has just finished his experimental airplane build, suddenly lost power at about 3k ft altitude. After going through proper protocol, he looked down and saw an old airfield with big yellow X's on the runway below him. He immediately dead sticked the plane down, successfully landing with no damage. He left a trail of fuel the length of his landing. Turns out he had a broken aluminum AN coupler in the fuel line. Looking at it, it appeared to this EE to be a fatigued aluminum tube within a swivel female to female coupling.

I told him not to bother buying a lottery ticket in the future, because his luck is all used up.

Depending on the useage of aluminum it can be just as safe as steel. In a non-moving, low vibration application, aluminum has no reason to fatigue (ie: frame rail runs) Flex lines are used in appropriate locations. The AN fittings are not lifetime items. In an aircraft there should be a lifespan limit dictated by runtime hours or number of times the fitting has been on/off. I think I can speak for all of us in this thread that giving a modified car a regular look-over is an important step in maintaining vehicle safety and reliability... Your friend is lucky for sure... Good piloting skills as well
Yeah, should be lower vibes than a light aircraft. But, if you hit a resonant frequency (drive a resonant frequency) all bets are off. Think tuning fork. You might want to have a few extra rubber clamps in order to make sure there is lots of damping.
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  #363  
Old 06-27-2018, 09:22 PM
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Not sure if your interested but I do have lift off carbon fiber hoods that are 7.5lbs. my second version I should be able to get down to 6lbs. most factory hoods I've weighed are 30lbs not including brackets. the bolt on hoods should be 10-11lbs. good deal of weight off the top of the car. I also am making a way to use the lift off hood as a normal functioning hinge style hood. T-tops are about 14lbs each for the early style fully assembled so if you can half 28 lbs that's a good deal weight off the top with carbon versions. carbon fiber rocker panels look cool and save some weight over the aluminum ones. I will be doing full functioning doors sometime, one piece targa top from carbon and a race weight one piece skin up top, carbon flares which you can throw a hammer at. Lots of plans just no money to do it all yet.
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  #364  
Old 06-27-2018, 11:49 PM
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Do you have any pictures of the assembled t tops? Id like to see the internal braces if possible
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  #365  
Old 06-29-2018, 08:43 AM
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Do you have any rear belly pans?
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  #366  
Old 07-01-2018, 03:09 AM
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Do you have any pictures of the assembled t tops? Id like to see the internal braces if possible
i havent made them yet, but they will be based off early 77 tops with the dual latches since those were the lightest design for the tops, I also may get the latches made in machined aluminum to shed further weight.
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  #367  
Old 07-22-2018, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by stingray composites View Post
Not sure if your interested but I do have lift off carbon fiber hoods that are 7.5lbs. my second version I should be able to get down to 6lbs. most factory hoods I've weighed are 30lbs not including brackets. the bolt on hoods should be 10-11lbs. good deal of weight off the top of the car. I also am making a way to use the lift off hood as a normal functioning hinge style hood. T-tops are about 14lbs each for the early style fully assembled so if you can half 28 lbs that's a good deal weight off the top with carbon versions. carbon fiber rocker panels look cool and save some weight over the aluminum ones. I will be doing full functioning doors sometime, one piece targa top from carbon and a race weight one piece skin up top, carbon flares which you can throw a hammer at. Lots of plans just no money to do it all yet.
I'm always interested in any weight loss options. I like the thought of lighter weight body components (as I believe Duntov said, that the body of a Corvette only serves to keep the wind and rain off the driver, and doesn't really contribute to the structural strength of the car). My frustration/concern with changing body panels/parts is, in addition to paint color matching, that the bodies of these antiques are so varied in build quality/tolerances that I don't know what difficulties arise when trying to fit an aftermarket part onto these cars.
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  #368  
Old 07-22-2018, 05:07 PM
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I'm still looking into additional areas to cut weight. I'm massaging a few of the present fabricated parts to pull off a few ounces here and there. My objective several years ago was to get something to work and be reliable. I'm now taking a closer look at stuff from a force/vector standpoint to see where I've overbuilt stuff.

I'm looking around for a lighter radiator/coolant volume combination. I have an aluminum DeWitts radiator on it presently. It's a very high quality piece that keeps the engine cool (I run a 195* thermostat) on 95* days. (I presently have most of the front grill area blocked off for less aero drag/lift, and have absolutely no cooling problems.) I'd like to experiment with a radiator with a touch less coolant volume to take a few pounds of coolant weight off ahead of the front axle.

Would love to run a lightweight Lithium battery in the car, but I still haven't found one that I don't have concerns about the possibility of a battery fire. Any helpful advice on this matter is welcomed.
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  #369  
Old 07-24-2018, 04:08 PM
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how about a polycarbonate front windshield, fiberglass bumpers, lightweight hood & t-tops, triple disc clutch w/reverse drive starter (not only lighter but lowers your moment of inertia), EDM lighten your ring gear...have I spent enough of your money yet?
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  #370  
Old 07-24-2018, 07:48 PM
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The front wheel wells look heavy. Iíll pull one off a junk front clip and weigh it.

Sheet alum wheel well world be light.
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