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Old 05-12-2008, 12:29 AM
1Michel 1Michel is offline
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Default Front Suspension explained

I check once in a while V8TV and the guy 's (Kevin) explainations are pretty good.

heres a link about the front suspension of a Cutlass hes rebuilding.

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Theres pretty interesting stuff there.

TT when the guy gets to the steering tie rod part I think it's from Baer brakes. check the system to eliminate the bump steer.

Ok I found it , heres another link for the bump steer thing

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What do you think of that?
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Last edited by 1Michel; 05-12-2008 at 12:33 AM..
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Old 05-12-2008, 07:00 AM
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Read the tech articles up top, most of it's in there. What those things do is allow you to change the outer tie rod position (height) but it does not address a fundamentally incorrectly designed system.
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Old 05-12-2008, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin_Turbo View Post
Read the tech articles up top, most of it's in there. What those things do is allow you to change the outer tie rod position (height) but it does not address a fundamentally incorrectly designed system.
TT:
How would you fix the incorrectly designed system-- without going to a front steer?
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Old 05-12-2008, 08:36 PM
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Front steer is simply the best for double a arm suspensions but you can do a rear steering rack setup, just make sure the rack is mounted rigidly and not on some flexy brackets with a crappy donut mount. An internal power box is a nice way to do it also, the biggest issue with the stock system, even when tight is that steering valve. It inherently gives you some slop, always!
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Old 05-12-2008, 08:54 PM
Stroker-427 Stroker-427 is offline
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Rear steer is not only bad..... there is even a good thing:

The akerman angle is much more active then with front steer!

The back side, basically, is bump-steer which is in the wrong side!
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Old 05-17-2008, 06:59 PM
1Michel 1Michel is offline
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ok not sure what is a ackerman angle.
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Old 05-17-2008, 08:15 PM
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Ackerman angle is the angle of the steering arms. Simply put, it causes the inner wheel (in a corner) to turn sharper than the outboard one.

Pier Paolo, yes but the the ackerman isn't all that important (doesn't have to be very active) unless you do a lot of low speed cornering (london taxi cabs have crazy ackerman )

The problem with the rear steer comes with bushing deflection. As you load the outside suspension corner during cornering the bushigns deflect and the lower arm is pushed inwards, however the steering system is not affected and the driver keeps putting input into the steering wheel. What this deflection causes is that the input is increased because the suspension moves in, this gives oversteer under deflefction. A front steering system gives understeer as a result. And understeer is much easier for a driver to control than oversteer (unless you're Schumi )
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Old 05-17-2008, 09:15 PM
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TT you measured a front stock suspension correctly before you did the mods. Where was the best position of the steering arms on the stock suspension to avoid bump steer as much as possible ?
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Old 05-17-2008, 10:21 PM
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The bump steer is not only in the steering arms, it's in the centerlink. So you have to adjust both. Adjsuting the steering arms with bumpsteer blocks affects the ackerman geometry. It's best to get the center link straightened out and then fine tune with the steering arm tie rod end height
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Old 05-18-2008, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin_Turbo View Post
The bump steer is not only in the steering arms, it's in the centerlink. So you have to adjust both. Adjsuting the steering arms with bumpsteer blocks affects the ackerman geometry. It's best to get the center link straightened out and then fine tune with the steering arm tie rod end height
Any ideas on what would be necessary in terms of centerlink ?
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