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  #431  
Old 11-20-2018, 09:33 PM
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I "spec'd out" some aluminum tubing (square and rectangular) to build a replacement front crossmember. With quarter inch walls on the pieces, the tensile (and post-weld) strength of the pieces calculate out to a number that should give an overbuilt/safety margin of around 10x. The material weight calculations come out to slightly less than 21 pounds (versus 35# for my present steel crossmember). With this much difference in weight, I could add a few more pounds in gusseting, and still end up with a piece that is lighter than the present piece and that doesn't cause me safety concerns every time I go out on the track.

The material costs don't appear to be too outrageous, but the shipping costs on the longer pieces does boost the cost noticeably. I need to keep looking around to see if I can keep the total cost withing reason.
Mike, Do you have a Metals Supermarket in your area? That's where I buy anything over 8ft.

Anything under 8ft I buy from Mcmaster Carr. I don't know how they do it but their shipping for long stuff like that is a fraction of what I get charged for shipping something that long. And, I usually have it the next day. You can call them and get shipping rates.
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  #432  
Old 11-20-2018, 10:21 PM
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Originally Posted by 69427 View Post
I "spec'd out" some aluminum tubing (square and rectangular) to build a replacement front crossmember. With quarter inch walls on the pieces, the tensile (and post-weld) strength of the pieces calculate out to a number that should give an overbuilt/safety margin of around 10x. The material weight calculations come out to slightly less than 21 pounds (versus 35# for my present steel crossmember). With this much difference in weight, I could add a few more pounds in gusseting, and still end up with a piece that is lighter than the present piece and that doesn't cause me safety concerns every time I go out on the track.

The material costs don't appear to be too outrageous, but the shipping costs on the longer pieces does boost the cost noticeably. I need to keep looking around to see if I can keep the total cost withing reason.
Mike, Do you have a Metals Supermarket in your area? That's where I buy anything over 8ft. I just googled those guys. A few of them in surrounding states, but none near where I'm at.
Anything under 8ft I buy from Mcmaster Carr. I don't know how they do it but their shipping for long stuff like that is a fraction of what I get charged for shipping something that long. And, I usually have it the next day. You can call them and get shipping rates.
I've ordered a bunch of stuff from McMaster Carr over the years, but I never thought about them when it comes to metal material. I'll get on their site and see what they got.

I appreciate it.
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  #433  
Old 12-18-2018, 04:15 AM
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I finally got the "new" aluminum p/s pump modified and ready to put on the car. I had to pull off the serpentine pulley (a damn shame, as it was a nice lightweight plastic piece) and replace it with the slightly heavier steel v-pulley off my previous steel pump. I managed to somewhat compensate for the heavier steel pulley by installing the smaller volume, lighter reservoir off the steel pump (the bigger reservoir wouldn't fit in the location anyway). I also trimmed a few unnecessary ounces off the aluminum bracket for the pump.

The "old" pump was about 6# even, and the "new" pump combination is 4.7#. Not a lot of difference, but I'm pretty much working with crumbs on the weight reductions anymore. I'm installing a C5Z p/s fluid cooler (11 oz) and the attending lines while I've got things apart, so I should still be able to get this done with a minimal weight penalty.
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  #434  
Old 01-01-2019, 10:37 PM
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Default Aluminum clutch linkage bellcrank/Z bar

In the occasional break from being tied up doing holiday stuff (and awaiting getting to finish the aluminum p/s pump and cooler install), I've been knocking around some ideas on replacing the current clutch Z bar with an aluminum lookalike. The spare bar I've got laying around is about 2.5# (39.3 oz), so perhaps I could take a touch of weight off by fabricating it in aluminum. The shape is certainly easy enough to duplicate if I make a temporary jig, and the right hand side that slides onto the ball stud screwed into the block is easy enough to make, but the left hand side that has the captured ball stud will take some thinking or searching (I'm looking to see what McMaster-Carr might have to offer).

I don't have an accurate feel (yet) for what the forces are on the bar arms (and the resulting torque in the tube between the arms), so I need to figure out if I can measure the actual forces, or just make a SWAG and then compare that to the tensile strength of the aluminum. I'm tied up doing a lot of family stuff this week, so I've got plenty of time to do some daydreaming to come up with some thoughts on this.
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  #435  
Old 01-01-2019, 11:03 PM
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Mike, Don't remember if I brought this up before but, how about replacing the rear view mirror (that has a heavy pot metal bracket) with a modern mirror (glued to the glass). I bet that mirror/bracket is over a pound and would be an easy swap.

OR, you could do what this guy does:

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  #436  
Old 01-02-2019, 01:39 AM
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Mike, Don't remember if I brought this up before but, how about replacing the rear view mirror (that has a heavy pot metal bracket) with a modern mirror (glued to the glass). I bet that mirror/bracket is over a pound and would be an easy swap.

OR, you could do what this guy does:

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I've remembered your mirror suggestion, and that is still on my watch list of junkyard parts. IIRC, I confessed my lack of knowledge on how to "unglue" the mirror from the donor car windshield.

I remember that scene from the movie.
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  #437  
Old 01-02-2019, 10:44 AM
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Heat Gun - carefully???
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  #438  
Old 01-02-2019, 11:36 AM
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I think most of the early ones have a metal piece that is glued to the widshield that has a dovetail. The shoe of the mirror slides on and a set screw locks it in place. Not sure but I think you can buy a kit that has the metal piece and adhesive so all you really need is the mirror.

This one includes the mirror, mounting bracket and adhesive for $14: Pilot Automotive Universal 8" Black Day Night Windshield Rear View Mirror
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  #439  
Old 01-03-2019, 12:05 AM
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Originally Posted by 69427 View Post
In the occasional break from being tied up doing holiday stuff (and awaiting getting to finish the aluminum p/s pump and cooler install), I've been knocking around some ideas on replacing the current clutch Z bar with an aluminum lookalike. The spare bar I've got laying around is about 2.5# (39.3 oz), so perhaps I could take a touch of weight off by fabricating it in aluminum. The shape is certainly easy enough to duplicate if I make a temporary jig, and the right hand side that slides onto the ball stud screwed into the block is easy enough to make, but the left hand side that has the captured ball stud will take some thinking or searching (I'm looking to see what McMaster-Carr might have to offer).

I don't have an accurate feel (yet) for what the forces are on the bar arms (and the resulting torque in the tube between the arms), so I need to figure out if I can measure the actual forces, or just make a SWAG and then compare that to the tensile strength of the aluminum. I'm tied up doing a lot of family stuff this week, so I've got plenty of time to do some daydreaming to come up with some thoughts on this.
Just my opinion on this... I would be nervous about the aluminum fatiguing with the constant leverage/twisting forces on each "arm" if the design was mimicked to the factory piece. Im thinking make the arms wide enough to drill the cross shaft so that the arm can be welded 360* to the tube. OR a factory looking piece could be made from chromoly but with much thinner material?
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  #440  
Old 01-12-2019, 09:40 AM
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Z bar in 6061 sounds reasonable. A little (very little) more deflection because of the lower modulus of elasticity but strength is similar to mild steel original. Might sleeve the linkage bar bearing surfaces with a sacrificial bronze insert (like shift levers) where the link bars attach. Don't think fatigue is a concern with current low use of car. IIRC the captured stud is held in place with a wire ring clip in a groove - replicate the OE pocket and reuse the stock ball stud and seats.
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